Dizziness, vertigo or balance problems? Vestibular physio may help

Could our London and Bromley vestibular physiotherapy service help you?

If you are experience vestibular problems our team of vestibular physiotherpist may be able to help.

Conditions of the vestibular system or inner ear can cause symptoms of dizziness, vertigo, loss of balance and nausea. Vestibular physiotherapists are specially trained to assess and treat these conditions, which include BPPV, vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis, vestibular hypofunction and other balance disorders.

Each vestibular condition has a unique treatment pathway and the specialised physiotherapists at Crystal Palace Physio Group are trained to assess each patient individually and form an effective, evidence based plan of management. Treatment may include canalith repositioning techniques such as the Epley manoeuvre, or may include the prescription of individualised vestibular exercise programs.

Conditions:

  • BPPV: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is the most common cause of vertigo symptoms. It is characterised by brief episodes of a spinning sensation that occur with changes of head position, such as when lying down or rolling over in bed. BPPV is caused by small calcium carbonate crystals (otoconia) that dislodge within the inner ear, travel into one of the vestibular canals and cause vertigo. BPPV can be effectively treated by a vestibular physiotherapist using repositioning manoeuvres.
  • Vestibular neuritis or labyrithitis: Viral infection of the inner ear that interferes with the function of the vestibular system. This condition is characterised by sudden onset, severe vertigo and loss of balance that persists for several hours to days. Imbalance and dizziness, particularly on fast head movements can then persist for several weeks to months. A vestibular rehabilitation program prescribed by a physiotherapist is very effective in improving the recovery of this condition.
  • Meniere’s Disease: A condition where there is an abnormality of the quantity or pressure of the fluid that circulates the inner ear. This condition is characterised by intermittent episodes of tinnitus, vertigo and nausea that last up to several hours. Outside of these attacks the patient may have some symptoms of dizziness and/or imbalance. A vestibular rehabilitation program prescribed by a physiotherapist can be effective in managing the symptoms or deficits between the vertigo attacks to improve a patient’s function and quality of life.
  • Vestibular Migraine: A migraine may not always result in head pain. Vestibular migraine is a condition characterised by episodes of vertigo, dizziness, nausea and imbalance that occur intermittently and may last several hours to several days. There may be sensitivity to light or loud noise and there is not always an associated headache, although the patient may have had traditional migraines in the past. In some cases physiotherapy may be effective, often together with medical intervention.
  • Cervicogenic Dizziness: Symptoms of imbalance and dizziness that arise due to impairments of the joints and muscles in the neck. This may be due to trauma such as whiplash or other conditions including osteoarthritis. Patients will usually have associated neck pain and/or restricted range of motion. Treatment of the joints and muscles in the neck, together with a vestibular rehabilitation program can be very effective to manage this condition.
  • Post-Concussion Syndrome: Any trauma to the head may result in concussion, even in the absence of any loss of consciousness. Post-concussion syndrome is any persistent symptoms that interfere with the patient’s daily life. These can include dizziness, nausea, imbalance and sensitivity to movement within their visual field. Together with thorough medical assessment, physiotherapy rehabilitation can help to improve these symptoms through a series of targeted rehabilitation exercises.

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